Research for stronger health systems during and after crisis

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How to promote a resilient health workforce in conflict-affected areas: insights from health workers and policymakers

Friday, 28 Oct 2016

Hear about ReBUILD’s innovative body of mixed methods research

Contribute to the discussion on promoting a resilient heath workforce in conflict affected areas

Human resources for health (HRH) is the most complex and most critical health system pillar, and one with many political ramifications. In post-conflict settings, where health systems and health worker livelihoods have been disrupted, there are particular challenges facing the establishment of the right incentive environment, and the contextual dynamics around them especially important to understand in order to rebuild effectively post-conflict.

In this session, ReBUILD will present findings from across the life-cycle of health workers – why they joined the profession, their experience of working in different sectors, how they coped with crisis, and how they manage complex remuneration. This will be complemented with analysis of HRH policy-making post-conflict in Sierra Leone, Uganda, Zimbabwe and Cambodia.

Session chair: Professor Sophie Witter

Panel:

  • Yotamu Chirwa – Health workers in different sectors in Zimbabwe, and how incentive policies influence these patterns in the post-conflict environment
  • Dr Haja Wurie – How have health workers in Sierra Leone coped post conflict and during the Ebola crisis? What can we learn from workforce response to these different crises for rebuilding a resilient and responsive health system?
  • Maria Bertone – How do staff manage complex remuneration and how does it affect what they do? How can this inform policies on pay and incentives?
  • Dr Sas Kargbo – What drives HRH policy-making post-conflict and how can opportunities for reform can be created and seized more effectively. How can challenges of multiple actors, fragmentation, weak institutions and getting policy into practice be addressed?