Research for stronger health systems post conflict

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  • Northern and Southern Uganda_The Political Economy of Maternal Health Care Policy Reform after a Regional Conflict in a Fragile State

Northern and Southern Uganda: The Political Economy of Maternal Health Care Policy Reform after a Regional Conflict in a Fragile State

This brief outlines the approach and findings from a study being done on the differences between policies for maternal health care in post-conflict and non-conflict-affected contexts in Uganda. This study represents part of a PhD being partly funded by the ReBUILD programme.

The brief concludes that maternal health care is not a donor priority in post-conflict environments. Donor influence and the political and economic background of a fragile state hold critical but modifiable links to horizontal equity and maternal health status. While political pluralism and decentralisation portend greater opportunities for health system strengthening in the post conflict setting, a higher socioeconomic economic status in the non-conflict setting and better literacy levels were social determinants that guaranteed better maternal health care utilisation. Women leaders play a critical role in the development of the health sector in the fragile state.

Download the brief here.